Schedule

Introduction

Week 1

T 8/27 – Overview: intro to Joyce, Ireland, Modernism

R 8/29 – From Dubliners handout: “Araby,” “Counterparts”

Week 2 – A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

T 9/3 – All selections are in the Portrait handout:

  • Early youth and school experiences (3-23)
  • Adolescent inklings about artistic vocation (59-60)
  • First sexual experience (93-95)
  • Religious reform (134-43)
  • Epiphany of the girl at the strand (164-66)

Blog Assignment: Based on our reading so far, how would you compare Stephen Dedalus to the characters we met in Dubliners?

R 9/5

  • Portrait (handout): Development of aesthetic theory and release into adulthood (196-209, 230-44)
  • Gilbert: “The Narrative of Ulysses” (3-23)
  • In-class exercise: How to read Ulysses

Ulysses Part I: The Telemachiad

Week 3

T 9/10

  • Episode 1 “Telemachus” (3-19)
  • Gilbert: “Telemachus” (97-107)

Blog assignment: Write about a moment in “Telemachus” that you found interesting or challenging.

R 9/12

  • Episode 2 “Nestor” (20-30)
  • Gilbert: “Nestor” (108-15)

Week 4

T 9/17

  • Episode 3 “Proteus” (31-42)
  • Gilbert: “Proteus” (116-33)

R 9/19

“ULYSSES Episode III” in The Little Review, May 1918. Bound reprints of the magazine may be found in McFarlin Library Periodicals, organized alphabetically, or at the Modernist Journals Project (http://modjourn.org).

Blog assignment: How does “ULYSSES Episode III” relate to the other content in the May 1918 Little Review? Be sure to quote from “Proteus” and at least one other item in the issue.

Ulysses Part II: The Odyssey

Week 5

T 9/24

  • Episode 4 “Calypso” (45-57)
  • Gilbert: “Calypso” (134-46)

Blog assignment: What do you make of the narrative’s sudden shift to Leopold Bloom? Does it comply with or depart from (or both) Joyce’s aesthetic aims in Dubliners and A Portrait?

R 9/26

  • Episode 5 “Lotus Eaters” (58-71)
  • Gilbert: “The Lotus-Eaters” (147-58)

Week 6

T 10/1

  • Episode 6 “Hades” (72-95)
  • Gilbert: “Hades” (159-76)

R 10/3

“ULYSSES Episode VI” in The Little Review, September 1918. Bound reprints of the magazine may be found in McFarlin Library Periodicals, organized alphabetically, or at the Modernist Journals Project (http://modjourn.org).

Blog Assignment: How does “ULYSSES Episode VI” relate to other content in the September 1918 Little Review? Be sure to quote from “ULYSSES Episode VI” and at least one other item in the issue.

Week 7

T 10/8

  • Episode 7 “Aeolus” (96-123)
  • Gilbert: “Aeolus” (177-98)

R 10/10

“ULYSSES Episode VII” in The Little Review, October 1918. Bound reprints of the magazine may be found in McFarlin Library Periodicals, organized alphabetically, or at the Modernist Journals Project (http://modjourn.org).

Blog Assignment: Group 1: How does “ULYSSES Episode VII” relate to other content in the October 1918 Little Review? Group 2: How do you read the serialized episode differently from the book version?

Week 8

T 10/15

  • Episode 8 “Lestrygonians” (124-50)
  • Gilbert: “The Lestrygonians” (199-210)

Midterm Paper Due

R 10/17

  • Episode 9 “Scylla and Charybdis” (151-79)
  • Gilbert: “Scylla and Charybdis” (211-26)

Week 9

T 10/22

  • Episode 10 “Wandering Rocks” (180-209)
  • Gilbert: “The Wandering Rocks” (227-39)

Blog assignment: Choose either this prompt or the “Sirens” one for Thursday. How does the narrative technique relate to the content of “Wandering Rocks”? Be sure to discuss at least one of the intrusions (where text is inserted from one section into another).

R 10/24

CLASS CANCELED

Week 10

T 10/29

  • Episode 11 “Sirens” (210-39)
  • Gilbert: “The Sirens” (240-57)

Here is a video of J.S. Bach’s “Little Fugue” in G minor, which features an interesting visual to show the different subjects (melody lines) as they run. It’s not the best performance but should at least show you how a fugue consists of these multiple simultaneous themes. Note how it begins with a single subject that gets repeated in a lower register as a second subject is introduced in the higher register. It builds in complexity as more and more “layers” of subjects get introduced. They also form a kind of call-and-response pattern. “Fugue” originally meant both flight and chase, so the musical form probably gets its name from this pattern of subjects “chasing” and “fleeing” one another within the piece.

Blog assignment: Choose either this prompt or the “Wandering Rocks” one for Tuesday. How do you think the fugal technique works in this episode? Why would Joyce invent the fugal technique to embody this particular content?

R 10/31

  • Episode 12 “Cyclops” (240-83)
  • Gilbert: “The Cyclops” (258-77)

Week 11

T 11/5

  • Episode 13 “Nausicaa” (284-313)
  • Gilbert: “Nausicaa” (278-93)

Special guest: Dr. Latham. Read his article (handout) on interruption in “Cyclops” and “Nausicaa.”

R 11/7

  • Episode 14 “Oxen of the Sun” (314-49)
  • Gilbert: “The Oxen of the Sun” (294-312)

Week 12

T 11/12

  • Episode 15 “Circe” (350-497)
  • Gilbert: “Circe” (313-48)

Blog assignment: What is the most interesting or challenging aspect of “Circe” to you, and how does it speak to the episode’s meaning?

R 11/14 — “Circe” (con’t)

Ulysses Part III: Nostos

Week 13

T 11/19

  • Episode 16 “Eumaeus” (501-43)
  • Gilbert: “Eumaeus” (349-68)

R 11/21

  • Episode 17 “Ithaca” (544-607)
  • Gilbert: “Ithaca” (369-84)

Week 14 THANKSGIVING BREAK

Week 15

T 12/3

  • Episode 18 “Penelope” (608-44)
  • Gilbert: “Penelope” (385-405)

Blog assignment: Why would Joyce shift to Molly Bloom’s point of view in the final episode of the novel? How does the narrative technique speak to this?

R 12/5

  • “Penelope” (con’t)
  • Selection from Finnegans Wake (handout)

Final Paper Due

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